Long known for its community service, bike shop Garfield hopes to bounce back after a wall collapses

When a wall behind Kraynick’s bike shop in Garfield collapsed on Friday, they were already prepared for the worst. The city says it condemned the building in December when work on a nearby building undermined its foundation. The store has been helping the community for decades and hopes to bounce back with the help of the community now. Bike Shop, Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 told. “You could actually come here and work on your bike for free. We’ll tell you how to do it and provide the tools for you.” The store has been in Garfield since 1976 and has been part of Pittsburgh at previous locations since the mid-1940s, when it was founded by Kraynick’s father. free of charge. This spirit leads to a determination to bounce back. “I learned that from Jerry. He said whatever is going on around you, always try to look for the positive. And that helps me get through everything. It’s all about attitude,” the current owner , Roc ky Cristobal, told Action News of Pittsburgh 4. The bikes and the interior of the store were exposed to rain Friday morning when the wall collapsed. Employees and friends have been busy all day trying to clean up and secure things. Kraynick says he continues to volunteer at his old store and the current owner has carried on his traditions. Cristobal himself volunteered at the store before buying the place nearly five years ago. Cristobal has a message for customers. “Hang on. We’ll fix your bikes. We’ll let people know on our social media and let you know what the next steps are. Right now I’m just a little worried about what may happen, dealing with the companies insurance and the city. Hopefully we can get our permits soon and get the ball rolling,” Cristobal told Pittsburgh’s Action. 4.Since the building’s condemnation in December, “We’ve been putting up work on the sidewalk and helping people there. Officially, we’re not open, but we’re still trying to keep people safe. We don’t let customers in,” Kraynick said. “I keep coming to volunteer because everyone loves it and I want things to continue.” Kraynick hopes a GoFundMe will be set up to help to channel the small business community support that has helped the community over the years.

When a wall behind Kraynick’s bike shop in Garfield collapsed on Friday, they were already prepared for the worst. The city says it condemned the building in December when work on a nearby building undermined its foundation. The store has been helping the community for decades and hopes to bounce back with the help of the community now.

“If you’re not familiar with what the store is, it’s a community store,” Jerry Kraynick, former owner of Kraynick’s Bike Shop, told Action News 4 of Pittsburgh. “You can actually come here and work on your bike for free. . We’ll tell you how to do it and provide the tools for you.”

The store has been in Garfield since 1976 and has been part of Pittsburgh at previous locations since the mid-1940s, when it was founded by Kraynick’s father.

Kraynick is still a volunteer at the store, which has been known not only to fix some people’s bikes for free, but also to teach customers how to do it themselves at no cost.

This spirit leads to a determination to bounce back.

“I learned that from Jerry. He said whatever is going on around you, always try to look for the positive. And that helps me get through it all. It’s all about attitude,” said current owner, Rocky Cristobal, to Action News of Pittsburgh. 4.

Bikes and the interior of the store were exposed to rain on Friday morning when the wall collapsed. Employees and friends have been busy all day trying to clean up and secure things. Kraynick says he continues to volunteer at his old store and the current owner has carried on his traditions. Cristobal himself offered his services in the store before buying the place nearly five years ago.

Cristobal has a message for customers.

“Hang on. We’ll fix your bikes. We’ll let people know on our social media and let you know what the next steps are. Right now I’m just a little worried about what may happen, dealing with the companies insurance and the city. Hopefully we can get our permits soon and get the ball rolling,” Cristobal told Action News 4 of Pittsburgh.

Since the condemnation of the building in December, “We have put up works on the sidewalk and we are helping people there. Officially we are not open, but we are still trying to take care of people safely We don’t leave clients,” Kraynick said. “I keep volunteering because everyone loves it and I want it to continue.”

Kraynick hopes a GoFundMe will be set up to help channel community support for the small business that has helped the community over the years.

About Marilyn Perkins

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